Guest Review: Devil’s Cub by Georgette Heyer (1932)

What it’s about: This is the second book in the Alastair trilogy, but it’s absolutely no problem to read on its own or to read them out of sync.

 It’s the late 18th Century, and twenty-four year old Dominic Alastair, Marquis of Vidal, is a spoiled, rich young man, who spends his time gambling and seducing women of a lower class than himself.

 After he kills someone in a duel, he’s forced to leave the country, England, for France. He wants to take his current favorite with him, Sophia Challoner. Sophia knows she’s not in his league, but hopes that a compromising situation will force Dominic to marry her, so she’s all for eloping with him to France.

 Mary Challoner, Sophia’s older and much wiser sister, thinks he will not. He will use her and abandon her. So, to teach him a lesson, she takes her sister’s place and not before they are far from home does Dominic discover who she is. Now she is in a compromising situation!

 He kidnaps her to Paris and promises to marry her to protect her virtue, but Mary won’t have any of it. Although she does like him, that rogue!

My thoughts: I loved this very entertaining story about the prim and proper (but certainly not scared of anything) Mary and the devilish Marquis of Vidal who never thought about anyone but himself, until he met and kidnapped Mary.

 The book is full of horse-and-coach chases, mothers with certain ambitions for their sons and daughters (think marriage, think Pride and Prejudice), powdered wigs and perfume.

 I loved the way the characters talk to each other, in a sort-of formal and old-fashioned way. I saw the ending coming from a long way ahead but that didn’t matter at all, it was great fun to see that it all ended as I had expected (and hoped).

 5 stars (out of 5)!

*Don’t forget to enter to win one of two fabulous Georgette Heyer Prize Packs from Sourcebooks. Also each “meaningful” comment on any Georgette Heyer post (including this one) in the month of August at Stiletto Storytime will also get you additional entries.*

19 Comments

Filed under Adult Books, Contests, Events, Georgette Heyer, historical fiction

19 responses to “Guest Review: Devil’s Cub by Georgette Heyer (1932)

  1. The way the characters talk to each other sounds intriguing-thanks for the great guest post!

  2. It’s a great book, Krystal!

  3. The guest post is by me, Leeswammes. Unfortunately the signature didn’t work so well.

    http://leeswammes.wordpress.com

  4. Pingback: Read My Guest Post on Stiletto StoryTime’s Blog! « Leeswammes' Blog

  5. Thank you leeswammes for the review! It always makes me laugh to see how these strong, independent (or as independent as they can be in the society of the time) women of the time fall for these rakes. It must be something about strength that draws them together, and it seems to work as they must the bad boys better men. I love this romantic recipe!

    • Colleen, the fun is of course that Mary doesn’t want to fall for this man, but can’t help herself.

      I think the attraction for the men is to have someone who can boss them about when needed. Yes, strength is the word!

  6. stilettostorytime

    Judith- The signature is showing up fine for me…are you not seeing it? I can change it if you would like but just so you know and others I asked can see it and click to get to your page. Let me know. Thanks for the guest post and for being part of the event!

  7. I really need to read this series. It is a favorite among many Heyer readers.

  8. Danielle

    Thanks for all of the reviews so far. I just finished “Cotillion” and loved it! I can’t wait to read more and this has been a great place to figure out what I want to read next.

    And for ebook readers, 46 of Georgette Heyer’s books are on sale this week in honor of her birthday. $1.99 for ebook editions at all ebook sellers. http://www.sourcebooks.com/readers/casavip/happy-birthday-ms-heyer.html

    (I follow you on twitter: @daniheiberg)

    • stilettostorytime

      Thanks Danielle…I will have a post up about the great Sourcebooks deal tomorrow for Heyer’s Birthday! Isn’t it a great deal…makes me want to do some shopping! =)

  9. I absolutely dislike Vidal, especially in the first half of the book. I like that he has to work to make up to Mary. Mary, I thought, I was the redeeming character in the book. As for Leonie back on the scene…I can’t stand her! The Duke of Avon, though, is as suave as ever.:D…. This isn’t one of my favourites, you can tell, but I’ve read it about three four times nevertheless!…

    • I agree, Risa. Vidal wasn’t a nice person to start with, but eventually he was ok. Mary was a great character, a bit of responsibility and conscience in all the melée. Leonie I didn’t like much, either. I think I did like her in the first book, but I can’t remember.

      I loved Devil’s Cub in general, though. Such fun to read.

      • I liked Leonie well enough in the first book. She was a child. She had an excuse to behave like one. I felt there wasn’t any call for her to be behaving like a nineteen year old in Devil’s Cub!

  10. This book is sitting on my shelf to read. I read his father’s story and was not much for the heroine in that one. This sounds like a more proming venture. Time to take it off the shelf.

  11. Mary Preston

    Another Georgette Heyer to add to my list. I’m loving the reviews this month thank you.

    marypres(AT)gmail(DOT)com

  12. I hadn’t realized this was a second in a series! I’ve been dying to read this one based on the title alone so I’m glad it was entertaining and good as a stand alone. Lovely review!

  13. Pingback: It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? « Leeswammes' Blog

Let's Talk....

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s