Thriller Thursday

Today on Stiletto Storytime, I wanted to highlight two recent thrillers that I have completed. Thrillers are a new thing for me. It’s not a genre I have gravitated towards in the past but for some reason recently I begun to pick them up and accept certain books for review I might not have before. I think it’s just something different and fresh for me at a time when my reading has begun to be pretty strenuous. Both of these books had me pretty intensely wrapped up in their stories and guessing until the very end.

https://i2.wp.com/palazzouguccioni.com/images/swirl-divider-with-line.jpg

https://i1.wp.com/4.bp.blogspot.com/_OQNMNDr3O-4/TH-E13U7adI/AAAAAAAAA_8/RQ2rQUZa2oA/s1600/PrettyLittleThings.jpg “Thirteen-year-old Lainey Emerson is the middle child in a home police are already familiar with: her mom works too much and her stepfather favors his own blood over another man’s problems—namely Lainey and her wild older sister. When Lainey fails to come home from a night out with friends, her disappearance is dismissed by the Coral Springs PD as just another disillusioned South Florida teen running away from suburban drama and an unhappy home life.

But FDLE Special Agent Bobby Dees, who heads up the department’s difficult Crimes Against Children Squad (CAC), is not quite so sure. Nicknamed “The Shepherd” by colleagues, he has an uncanny ability to find the missing and bring them back home—dead or alive. After a search of Lainey’s computer and a frank talk with her best friend reveal the teen was involved in a secret internet relationship, Bobby suspects she may be the victim of an online predator. And when chilling evidence of other possible victims is sent to a local Miami television station, he fears she may not be the only one.

The faceless monster from cyberspace, who has gone to remarkable lengths to stay invisible, now seeks a captive audience. And it’s Bobby Dees he wants watching. Haunted by the still-unsolved disappearance of his own teenage daughter, Bobby will find himself pulled into a deadly game of cat and mouse with the most prolific killer he’s ever encountered. But will he be able to save Lainey and the others before it’s too late?”

Pretty Little Things by Jilliane Hoffman was a book I kind of deliberated on before accepting it for review. At my first look at the description I was afraid it would be too graphic for me. I really don’t do well with overly graphic sexual violence or cruelty of any kind. It’s just hard for me to read and then put out of my mind. I tend to take things in and not be able to turn them “off” so I have learned to be careful about what I allow “in”. However what intrigued me about this book is the fact that it was related to social media on the internet, something I work with on a daily basis and that it was written by someone who is an expert in the field of  criminal investigation. I enjoy reading works by people who know what they are talking about, who know the details and the ins and outs, not from research but from real life. You can certainly feel it in a book.

Hoffman’s Pretty Little Things is a terrific reminder to parents about the dangers of the internet and social media. Today’s teens live so much of their lives online, they don’t think anything is really private or out of bounds anymore. They live in a world where they still think they are invincible as teenagers do but without proper supervision they could come in contact with a parent’s worse nightmare from the safety of their own bedroom.

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” Danielle O’Rourke’s gala evening at the Devor Museum ends in catastrophe when the body of a young artist plummets from her office window. The police label it murder and suspect Dani, the Museum’s chief fundraiser. Self-preservation and an insider’s understanding of how money moves the art world drive her to investigate who might have a motive for murder. Dani’s playboy ex-husband and a green-eyed cop complicate matters as her search moves through the fashionable worlds of San Francisco and Santa Fe.”

Murder in the Abstract is a sophisticated Whodunit? with a great artistic twist. It takes you into the world of high end art museums and the process of soliciting million dollar art donations from prospective donors. Readers get an inside view of how artists and museums work together with donors and collectors to create the massive collections we see at the world’s best museums. However we also get the mystery of who killed the soon to be famous artist and a look into the life of our protagonist Danielle O’Rourke. Once half of a high profile, old money marriage, Danielle now finds herself working in the old money world of art and a target in a mysterious murder. Who killed the artist and what connection do they have to Danielle? Author Susan C. Shea will keep you guessing until the very last page in this artistic thriller.

7 Comments

Filed under Adult Books, New Books, Thrillers

7 responses to “Thriller Thursday

  1. stacybuckeye

    I love good thrillers but wasn’t familiar with either of these. Thanks for the reviews.

  2. I do love a good thriller and both of these sound good to me.

  3. Terry Shames

    Murder in the Abstract was one of my favorite reads this summer. Smart, witty and stylish, it’s an inside slant on the art world as well as a snappy mystery. Love Dani O’Rourke and her appealing “bad boy” ex-husband.

  4. Murder in the Abstract has all of the elements of a perfect mystery. It’s a great read!

  5. Pingback: Tualatin takes it – in a thriller | hand bag shopping

  6. Mysti Berry

    Wasn’t Murder in the Abstract fun? Looking forward to more from Ms. Shea!

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